Tuesday, March 6, 2012

U.S. Kids Still Eat Too Much Added Sugar

Even with labeling laws getting better, it is still our responsibility to protect ourselves and our families.  First, we must understand that the food industry will sell us whatever it can to make people buy more food.  Second, we have to understand, as Samantha Heller states in this article, "Whoever is the gatekeeper for the family food supply needs to take a good, hard look at their choices. Obviously, junk foods, cookies, desserts and sodas are high in sugar and non-nutritive calories."  Most importantly, once we know what the situation is we must have the will to take action.
Though consumption has fallen, it's far above recommended levels
Wednesday, February 29, 2012
HealthDay news image
Related MedlinePlus Pages
"WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Added sugar in drinks and foods makes up almost 16 percent of the calories U.S. children and teens consume, federal health officials report.
That's far more than the daily recommendation of no more than 15 percent of calories fromboth sugar and fat, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, published online Feb. 29 in the National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief.
"We were interested in looking at added sugar consumption in children because of the significant prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States and the fact that the dietary guidelines recommend that 5 to 15 percent of calories come from added sugars or fats," explained lead researcher Cynthia Ogden, an epidemiologist with CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
Although the consumption of added sugars decreased between 1999 and 2008, it's still above recommended levels, she said: Boys consume about 362 calories a day from added sugar, and girls eat about 282 calories in added sugar on a daily basis.
Sugar consumption also went up as children got older, the report showed."
"Samantha Heller, a dietitian and nutritionist based in Connecticut, said that "we are turning our home kitchens into junk-food havens."
While sugar per se is not evil, too many added sugars increase the risk for obesity, diabetes, high triglycerides, high cholesterol, heart disease and more, she said.
"Whoever is the gatekeeper for the family food supply needs to take a good, hard look at their choices. Obviously, junk foods, cookies, desserts and sodas are high in sugar and non-nutritive calories," Heller said.
But added sugars lurk in unexpected places such as dried fruit snacks, instant iced teas, banana chips, fruit punch, boxed dessert mixes, fat-free caramel popcorn, chicken nuggets, ketchup, BBQ sauce, tartar sauce and fat-free salad dressings, she noted."

Even with labeling laws getting better, it is still our responsibility to protect ourselves and our families first by understanding that the food industry will sell you whatever it can to make people buy more food.  Secondly we have to understand as Samantha Heller states in this article, "Whoever is the gatekeeper for the family food supply needs to take a good, hard look at their choices. Obviously, junk foods, cookies, desserts and sodas are high in sugar and non-nutritive calories."  Most importantly, once we know what the situation is we musthave the will to take action.

For more information, contact us at HealthCoachResource.TSFL.com

No comments:

Post a Comment